Lieldzelda

With some new DNA tests in the works, I thought it would be good to catch up on the background research of the Akerfelds family. All Latvian Akerfeldses have been traced back to a little estate called Lieldzelda in southwest Kurzeme. “Lieldzelda”, known as Gross Dselden in German, means “Big Dzelda” and indeed, there was also a Mazdzelda (Klein Dselden) or “Small Dzelda” just to the west (Although today, it seems both have been combined and there is a little town called simply Dzelda). Here’s the area as mapped out in the 1930’s, with some key farms to the Akerfeldses dotted in red:

Lieldzelda

Lieldzelda estate and it’s manor house were owned by the von Simolin family, members of whom had lived there since before conventional genealogical records were kept. They actually owned several estates in the area, including Brinkenhof where the farm Skrundenieki was – the farm my grandfather was born on. The current baron at the time even signed the paperwork for the sale of the farm to my great great uncle Arturs Ziverts.

The von Simolins were actually a branch of an old ennobled Hungarian family, the Bathory family. Several members of this family held important positions of power throughout history in Eastern Europe (modern Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, Poland, etc). And, just in time for Halloween, this family produced an infamously dark figure in history – Elizabeth Bathory, otherwise known as the Guinness World Record holder for most prolific female murderer, who is sometimes considered to be the influence on which the story of Count Dracula is based upon (along with Vlad of Wallachia) due to her habit of bathing in the blood of virgins to maintain her youthful appearance.

There’s a secondary reason I wanted to post about the von Simolins – depending on the results of one of the latest Akerfelds DNA results, I should be able to tell if the mother of the known brothers and sisters from whom us Akerfeldses descend was indeed an unmarried woman named Ilze Grinberga. If she IS… then the mystery father is up for debate – but it’s not uncommon for barons or nobility to have fathered illegitimate children with peasants from their estates. Keeping in mind our Akerfelds Y haplogroup, I-P37 – most common around Croatia, Slovenia, Romania, etc, combined with my “sticky” southern European matches… do you see where I’m going? It’s far-fetched for now, but it’s something to keep in mind!

I wonder if I could find any living descendants of the von Simolins who might be willing to take a DNA test…

One thought on “Lieldzelda

  1. Pingback: Naming Illegitimate Children | A Latvian Canadian Story

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